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This necklace and set of five brooches are part of the permanent collection of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. Made of shell and gold, they date back to about 1840 and were a gift of the Misses Cornelia and Susan Dehon in memory of Mrs. Sidney Brooks. Photograph © Museum of Fine Arts, Boston
Jewelers’ love affair with cameos has been recurrent since the Roman era, and a handful of contemporary designers continue to innovate the iconic jewelry style.
A new book, Christie’s: The Jewellery Archives Revealed, tells the stories behind the auction house’s most iconic sales.
Here are the top five stories published on NationalJeweler.com for the week of Sept. 4 to 10, according to Google Analytics.
This engraved gold ring was made between 1600 and 1650 A.D. in England. The Victoria and Albert Museum acquired it from a prolific 19th century British ring collector, Edmund Waterton. © Victoria and Albert Museum, London
Once used as seals and still embraced by today’s jewelry designers, signet rings have held an enduring allure throughout the ages.
The jewelry of an Auschwitz deportee hidden in a double-bottom mug evaded detection by Nazis and historians for over 70 years.
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Fine Jewelry Industry News

Since 1906, National Jeweler has been the must-read news source for smart jewelry professionals--jewelry retailers, designers, buyers, manufacturers, and suppliers. From market analysis to emerging jewelry trends, we cover the important industry topics vital to the everyday success of jewelry professionals worldwide. National Jeweler delivers the most urgent jewelry news necessary for running your day-to-day jewelry business here, and via our daily e-newsletter, website and other specialty publications, such as "The State of the Majors." National Jeweler is published by Jewelers of America, the leading nonprofit jewelry association in the United States.
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