Maria Sharapova, Svetlana Kuznetsova, Serena Williams and Martina Hingis lit up the USTA National Tennis Center at the U.S. Open this week. I'm referring to the jewelry they wore in addition to the fact that each of the seeded players won their match and succeeded to the next round.


Sharapova, the winner of the 2006 U.S. Open, out-glammed them all with 600 crystals on a red flared dress (pictured), crafted by designers from Nike. Dangling from Sharapova's lobes and occasionally smacking her in the jaw, was a pair of three-pearl drop earrings from Tiffany & Co. On a side note, the luxury jeweler is offering a limited-edition collection in celebration of the U.S. Open through the Web site for the sporting event.


Like superwoman, Kuznetsova wore a large "S" on her chest. However, the No. 4 seed's extra-large letter was made of diamonds and swung from a necklace. Williams donned mega-sized gold earrings, and Hingis sported a thick chain and earrings of sterling silver.


With accessories revealing their powerful feminine side, these players looked and performed fabulously. Some top seeders, however, scored "love" (the tennis term meaning zero) in the style department. I won't reveal their identities, but if you happen to figure out who they are from watching a match, don't hold it against them. Remember fashion, like tennis, is a game of hit and miss.



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