Print
Dan Gendron is a sixth generation watchmaker, working in the trade for more than 47 years. He is the author of “It’s TIME to Make MORE Money with Watch Repairs” and “Simplified Mechanical Watch Repair for Profit.” Reach him at talktothewatchguy@gmail.com.
In our last article we explained why it is necessary to become a watch professional, especially as it relates to watch batteries. 


Now let’s get into the “how to” of changing watch batteries with this handy, step-by-step visual guide.

First, start off by cleaning the “fromage corps” (debris) from the case back.

This is important … don’t skip this!  I know you have all seen a wiggling second hand before. This is most often caused by one of two things:  water--it got wet--or, quite commonly, someone opened the back without first cleaning the debris, which gets inside the movement, hanging up the gears.

First, start off by cleaning the “fromage corps” (debris) from the case back. This is important … don’t skip this!  I know you have all seen a wiggling second hand before. This is most often caused by one of two things:  water--it got wet--or, quite commonly, someone opened the back without first cleaning the debris, which gets inside the movement, hanging up the gears.

Next, inspect the gasket. This is also very important. It’s a gift to yourself. We all have had a snap-on or twist- on caseback that has caused us a great deal of frustration, trying to get it closed without breaking the crystal (or anything else).

So look closely at the gasket to ensure it lies flat within the channel in the caseback. Most importantly, ensure that there is no debris stuck to the gasket. If there is, use your brush to remove it or change the gasket, at cost of 5 cents to you.

Silicone case sealant is a white grease, not the same stuff you use to seal your shower door. It is your friend.  An otherwise difficult snap-on back can be made to close with great ease by applying with a cotton swab a thin sheen of silicone on the caseback gasket, as well as between the crown and the casetube. Click through the slideshow below to see how it’s done.

You will also need a well-stocked battery cabinet. Since 1957, when the Hamilton watch company invented the first watch battery, watch battery companies have added numbers, seemingly to infinity. We recommend the Energizer battery cabinet, which most of you have. Some of you have Renata, whose numbering is the same. Be sure you have ample supplies (about 25) of each of the following numbers:
321;  
364;  
371;  
377; and
395.

20160802 battery-cabinet

About five of any other numbers should suffice for your battery stock.
NOTE: You want to be wary of purchasing batteries made in Asia, as some of them still contain mercury.

Next, this slideshow showcases the tools and supplies you need in order to correctly replace a watch battery.



Last, but not least, take a few seconds to rub the watch down with a rouge rag or Selvet cloth.  Show the customer you are proud of your handiwork by handing it back to them with a little bit of sparkle.

20160802 polish-it-up

In our next article we will discuss the science of selling repairs.

Dan Gendron is a sixth generation watchmaker, working in the trade for more than 47 years. He is the author of It's TIME to Make MORE Money with Watch Repairs and Simplified Mechanical Watch Repair for Profit, as well as a 12-part educational video series, A Course in Profits with Watch Repairs. To buy copies of his books and videos email him at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.


|Subscribe >



Copyright © 2019 National Jeweler. All Rights Reserved.