This is a computer-generated image of the 179-carat “The Romanovs” rough diamond. Its name is a nod to Romanov-era ruler Peter the Great, who launched the development of the country’s diamond deposits and ordered the creation of Russia’s first diamond cutting and polishing factory in the early 18th century.
Moscow--In Russia, The Romanovs have become a dynasty again, so to speak.

This week, Russian diamond mining company Alrosa unveiled the diamonds it cut from a 179-carat piece of rough it unearthed in 2015 and dubbed “The Romanovs.”

All told, the big stone produced five diamonds totaling 76.22 carats, a yield of about 43 percent.

They are slated to be sold individually at a special online auction this fall.

Pavel Vinikhin, director of Diamonds Alrosa, the company’s cutting and polishing division, told National Jeweler on Thursday that Alrosa places the value of the five-stone collection, called “The Dynasty,” around $10 million but might change this following upcoming auction previews in Hong Kong and Israel.

The crowning glory of the collection, a diamond also dubbed “The Dynasty,” is a 51.38-carat round brilliant that is the highest-quality diamond of its size ever cut by Alrosa.

The Gemological Institute of America graded The Dynasty as a D color, VVS1 clarity diamond with a triple excellent cut.

Alrosa has cut and polished diamonds that are bigger.

The largest 57-facet round brilliant diamond cut by Alrosa was 52.26 carats, and the mining company also cleaved the pear-shaped 80.59-carat Star of Vilyuisk.

But neither diamond was of the same color and clarity as The Dynasty.

20170803 The DynastyThis picture provided by Alrosa shows the 51.38 D color, VVS1 clarity diamond called “The Dynasty” in its finished state. 
Alrosa created the five diamonds in the collection at its cutting and polishing facilities in Moscow.

The company said its most experienced cutters worked on whittling down the 179-carat Romanovs diamond, discovered at the Nyurbinskaya kimberlite pipe in the Republic of Sakha (Yakutia) two years ago.

Because of the high-pressure nature of the job--one mistake on a large, valuable stone like The Romanovs could be very costly--the cutters were put on a week-long leave several times, Alrosa said.

Commenting on the creation of the 51.38-carat diamond specifically, Vinikhin said in a press release: “This stone gives a start to a new stage in the development of Alrosa’s cutting division that will actively develop polishing of extra-large and colored diamonds. The Dynasty demonstrated that we can do it at the highest level. We work a lot on the technique, combine modern technologies with the secrets of jewelers of the Russian Imperial Court.”

The other four stones cut from the rough are named for individuals who played a crucial role in the development of the jewelry industry in Russia.



The second-largest stone is the 16.67-carat round brilliant Sheremetevs diamond, named for Count Pyotr Sheremetev, a companion of Peter the Great and a senator under Catherine the Great who was a customer of the Russian jewelry houses of his time.

There is also the 5.05-carat oval-shaped Orlovs diamond, named for Count Grigory Orlov, the senator who gave the famous 189.6-carat Orlov Diamond to Empress Catherine II.

The 1.73-carat pear-shaped Vorontsovs is named for the one-time chancellor of the Russian Empire, Count Mikhail Vorontsov, while The Yusupovs, a 1.39-carat oval, is a nod to Prince Nikolai Yusupov, who started his family’s massive jewelry collection.

All four are D color and VVS1 clarity.

The online auction of the Dynasty collection is slated to take place in November. Terms of participation are available on Dynasty.Alrosa.Ru.

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