By Brecken Branstrator
brecken.branstrator@nationaljeweler.com
I enjoy going beyond the beautiful pieces that we’re treated to every day to explore where jewelry is meeting science and innovation (see: this and this.)

The Internet recently gifted me a new topic when I stumbled onto a piece by British designer Alexander Davis, who creates DNA pendants that are unique to each wearer and inspired by his degree in biochemistry.

When a DNA pendant is commissioned by a client, they take a blood sample from the wearer (so, not for the faint of heart) and send it to a lab for DNA sequencing, Davis told me over email. They then find an area of their DNA that is likely to contain some unique code on which they can model the pendant.

062215_Alexander Davis DNA Pendant

The combination of gemstones on the necklace corresponds to a unique part of that sequence, representing their four-letter DNA code.

This particular one pictured here is made in platinum and set with diamonds and sapphires, but each pendant can be customized with the gems of the wearer’s choice, which of course affects the price.

Davis told me that his DNA pendants are priced from £15,000 (roughly $23,800) depending on stone selection and the blood sequence, which may seem a little steep, but then again these pendants would offer the wearer the epitome of one of the top trends today--a truly unique, one-of-a-kind piece of jewelry.



Get the Daily News >
National Jeweler

Fine Jewelry Industry News

Since 1906, National Jeweler has been the must-read news source for smart jewelry professionals--jewelry retailers, designers, buyers, manufacturers, and suppliers. From market analysis to emerging jewelry trends, we cover the important industry topics vital to the everyday success of jewelry professionals worldwide. National Jeweler delivers the most urgent jewelry news necessary for running your day-to-day jewelry business here, and via our daily e-newsletter, website and other specialty publications, such as "The State of the Majors." National Jeweler is published by Jewelers of America, the leading nonprofit jewelry association in the United States.