New York--Movement, openwork and jewelry with an air of spirituality are among the trends expected to be big in the coming year, and retailers who want to capitalize on selling these styles will need to consistently engage with their customers so they know to come into their store for the hottest, latest looks.

“Trends are something that are so vital to our business,” Amanda Gizzi, director of public relations and special events at Jewelers of America, said during a jewelry trends seminar held Monday at the JA New York Summer show.

“What’s going to drive in customers? What’s going to hit that hot button and bring in people off the street? Especially with women, it’s all about that self-purchase, and that’s what makes trends so powerful,” she said.

Gizzi outlined four mega trends for 2016 and the micro-trends that fall under them.

1. Airy perspective. “These are pieces that are refined,” Gizzi said. “It isn’t minimalist, but one beautiful piece that has lots of movement and lots of open space.”

Micro-trends:
--Graphic illusions, or pieces with curves, waves and fluidity that offer lots of flowy lines and movement; these pieces don’t lie flat on the body
--Pattern evolution, which includes geometric patterns and cut-out effects that lets the skin show through
--Smooth intensity, using transparent metals or those with a high or glossy polish

Dark glamour jewelry trendMeghna Jewels’ ear cuffs illustrate the micro-trend of dark glamour2. Dramatic poetry. This includes jewelry with a very dark color palette “that has drama to it,” Gizzi said. “This is a play on women wanting to look beautiful but with warmer colors and textures.”

Micro-trends:
--Mysterious boudoir, or lace, scrollwork and contrasting colors that “show the piece is feminine, but not overly girly”
--Dark glamour, including jewelry shaped as wings and feathers, vintage pieces, scale-inspired patterns and old Hollywood glamour; blackened materials work well here because the hue “gives a lot of drama.”
--Wicked garden, also known as nature-inspired pieces--think leaves, branches and thorns--done in a new way

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3. Global delights. “This is all about how people’s obsessions with things outside of their normal world influence what they want to buy and wear,” Gizzi said. “It’s about going to exotic places and wanting to have a reminder of that with them at all times.”

Micro-trends:
--Exotic tales, referring to “things that have spiritual influences all across the board, particularly in high-karat gold, but also in sterling silver and blackened metals as well,” she said. This scope also covers carved gemstones and cameos that embody cultural references and ethnic influences.
--Glitzy bloom, those bright floral designs that continue to stick around in glittering colors and bright gemstones
--Cracked origins, which is all about cracked surfaces and fossilized pieces in these “really organic, natural formations,” she said.

4. Digital East. Jewelry that takes inspiration from the Far East.

Micro-trends:
--Pixel collision, such as gemstone mosaics, pieces with an ombré or pixelated effect and multicolor pavé
--Urban pulsations, which includes emojis, wearable technology, digital pop culture and neon and primary colors. This trend is about “just having a little more fun with things,” Gizzi said.

When it comes to jewelers using these trends to their advantage, Gizzi said it’s not enough to just know what they are. Retailers have to be able to market the trends accordingly to help drive business.

Here’s what she recommends retailers do.
--Read and watch. Be vigilant. See what people are talking about, visit websites like TheCut.com and read InStyle magazine. See what’s happening and what designers are pushing; this is what women are aspiring for.

--Promote the trends carried in the store. Use email, the store’s website, tie it into social media accounts--and always be telling the same story.

--Connect and discuss on social media. “Use hashtags; it ties you and other people to a larger discussion. It’s all about connecting,” Gizzi said, using hashtag examples such as #trendy, #instajewels and #diamonds.

--Watch and join the conversation. “When we watch the red carpet (shows), we’re telling JA members to join us in that conversation,” Gizzi said, so all retailers need to get in on the action when these events happen and join the discussion. If a jeweler carries a style similar to what was seen on the red carpet, show it--this is a great way to reach new customers.

--Instagram. This is the most powerful tool a retailer or jewelry designer can have right now. “You’re simply telling a story through pictures and hashtags so people can find you,” she said.

--Invest. Invest time and tools into being able to share trends. Women need more reasons to come into jewelry stores and buy product, especially today. “This is where trends can really take your business to the next level,” Gizzi said.

--Refresh. Jewelers cannot promote trends with the same inventory they’ve had for the past two years. Make sure the store has something new that will allow it to be part of the discussion.


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