Grading

GIA Now Issuing Country of Origin Reports for Diamonds

GradingMay 30, 2019

GIA Now Issuing Country of Origin Reports for Diamonds

The reports, which also include the full four Cs, were introduced earlier this year.

The Gemological Institute of America said it will support its new Diamond Origin Report with digital and print marketing, including high-definition images of the original rough and resulting polished, so retailers can tell the story to their customers.

Carlsbad, Calif.—The Gemological Institute of America is now offering grading reports for polished diamonds that confirm the stone’s country of origin.

In order to receive a Diamond Origin Report, companies have to first submit the rough to GIA in sealed packets with Kimberley Process and other documentation. The lab, which has decades of scientific research into the formation and characteristics of natural diamonds on file, will then examine the rough and record data about it.

When the resulting polished diamond comes in for grading, GIA said it will use physical measurements and other scientific data to compare the two stones. If they match, then a Diamond Origin Report is issued.

The new reports list the country where the diamond came from as well as the full four Cs. The diamond also is inscribed with the report number.

Additional information about the country from which the diamond came and diamond formation will be available via GIA’s online Report Check service, accessible at GIA.edu or through the QR code printed on each report.

The Diamond Origin Report was introduced at the end of April after GIA consulted with mining companies, manufacturers and retailers regarding their traceability needs, and conducted consumer research, which it said showed that 69 percent of U.S. bridal customers prefer a diamond with an origin story.

It is the latest major industry player to address diamond traceability this year.

In January, Tiffany & Co. rolled out its “Diamond Source Initiative,” in which it is telling consumers the country of origin for most diamonds 0.18 carats or larger, and, in April, De Beers relaxed its rules around sightholders attaching a De Beers name to their goods.

GIA said manufacturers, retailers and miners—including Alrosa—are participating in its Diamond Origin Report program, and that it has already has recorded data for thousands of rough diamonds ranging from 0.15 to more than 100 carats.

“In recent years, here has been a growing demand for transparency and traceability in the diamond industry,” President and CEO Susan Jacques said. “Consumers want to know the origin of products and their socio-economic and environmental impact.”

The GIA Diamond Origin Report is slightly more expensive than the regular Diamond Grading Report. For example, an origin report for diamonds that are 1 to 1.19 carats is $138, while a standard report for stones of the same size costs $110.

The prices for all GIA’s natural diamond grading reports can be seen on GIA.edu.

The

turnaround time for polished diamonds receiving an origin report is the same as for other diamond reports.

GIA is exhibiting at JCK Las Vegas, Booth #18019 at the Sands Convention Center. For more information on its activities and services at the jewelry trade show, visit the lab’s website.
Michelle Graffis the editor-in-chief at National Jeweler, directing the publication’s coverage both online and in print.

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